Below you can chose a security game corresponding to different cryptographic primitives. The first game corresponds to one of the weaker notions of secrecy: Private Key encryption scheme security in presence of an eavsdropper. Two following games capture security of two commonly used cryptographic primitives, namely Pseudorandom Generators (PRGs) and Pseudorandom Functions (PRFs).
Following definitions are computational in nature; That means distinguishers are considered to be efficient, i.e. their runtime is polynomial in the length of their input.
All the games below are designed to teach the definitions through attacks. Meaning all implemented primitives are in fact insecure and the task is to find and then properly describe an attack that would break them.
Definitions for games below are taken from Introduction to Modern Cryptography (2nd edition) by Jonathan Katz and Yehuda Lindell [KL].

PrivKeav

Encryption deals with keeping the message secret. Definition 3.8, page 55 [KL].

PRG

Pseudorandom Generators are used to produce long strings of bits that look random to efficient algorithms. Definition 3.14, page 62 [KL], the definition we use specifically is one using the indistinguishability experiment of Exercise 3.5, page 102 [KL].

PRF

Pseudorandom Faunctions (Wikipedia, survey on ePrint) are families of functions that behave as random, when a limited number of queries are made to them. Definition 3.25, page 79 [KL], the definition we use specifically is one using the indistinguishability experiment of Exercise 3.12, page 103 [KL].