Language, art and music are extremely revealing about workings of the human mind

I was interviewed by Gisela Govaart about my research. The interview is published online here.

***

Language, art and music are extremely revealing about workings of the human mind” – An interview with Jelle Zuidema
by Gisela Govaart, January 2016

Jelle Zuidema is assistant professor in cognitive science and computational linguistics at the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation. He does research on these topics, coordinates the Cognition, Language and Computation lab and supervises five PhD and several MSc students there. He teaches in the interdisciplinary master’s programs Brain & Cognitive Sciences (MBCS), Artificial Intelligence, and Logic, and coordinates the Cognitive Science track in the MBCS. Jelle was the organizer of the SMART CS events from 2011 until 2015.

Jelle Zuidema

“I started my studies with two programs in parallel at the University of Utrecht: Liberal Arts – where I focused on Literature – and Artificial Intelligence. In my final two years I dropped Liberal Arts, because I decided I needed to specialize; I got my degree in AI, with a specialization in Theoretical Biology. My thesis was on Evolution of Language, so it was a rather weird mix. I was first interested in evolution, and then my supervisor suggested: since you have this background in computational linguistics and logic, why don’t you look at the evolution of language. So it was a bit accidental, but immediately things started to fall into place, and I got really excited about the topic, and decided that I wanted to do my PhD on that as well. For my PhD I moved first briefly to Paris, and then I was in Brussels for two years, in the group of Luc Steels. After two years Brussels I moved to Edinburgh, and I actually got my PhD degree from the University of Edinburgh in the group of Simon Kirby.”

Continue reading

Phong Le’s PhD defense

On June 3d, my PhD student Phong Le successfully defended his PhD thesis, entitled “Learning Vector Representations for Sentences – The Recursive Deep Learning Approach” (committee members Max Welling, Mirella Lapata, Marco Baroni, Raquel Fernandez, Ivan Titov).

***

Learning Vector Representations for Sentences – The Recursive Deep Learning Approach
Phong Lê

Abstract:

Natural language processing (NLP) systems, until recently, relied heavily on sophisticated representations and carefully designed feature sets. Now with the rise of deep learning, for the first time in the history of NLP, the importance of such manual feature engineering has started to be challenged. Deep learning systems using very few handcrafted features can achieve state-of-the-art (or nearly state-of-the-art) performance on many tasks, such as syntactic parsing, machine translation, sentiment analysis, and language modelling. However, rather than letting deep learning replace linguistically informed approaches, in this dissertation I explore how linguistic knowledge can provide insights for building even better neural network models. I tackle the problem of transforming sentences into vectors by employing a hybrid approach of symbolic NLP and connectionist deep learning based on the principle of compositionality. In this approach, the role of symbolic NLP is to provide syntactic structures whereas composition functions are implemented (and trained) by connectionist deep learning.

All of the models I develop in this dissertation are variants of the Recursive neural network (RNN). The RNN takes a sentence, syntactic tree, and vector representations for the words in the sentence as input, and applies a neural network to recursively compute vector representations for all the phrases in the tree and the complete sentence. The RNN is a popular model because of its elegant definition and promising empirical results. However, it also has some serious limitations: (i) the composition functions it can learn are linguistically impoverished, (ii) it can only be used in a bottom-up fashion, and (iii) it is extremely sensitive to errors in the syntactic trees it is presented with. Starting with the classic RNN, I propose extensions along three different directions that solve each of these problems.

The first direction focuses on strengthening the composition functions. One way to do that is making use of syntactic information and contexts, as in Chapter 3. In that chapter, I propose composition functions, which are also one-layer feed-forward neural networks, taking into account representations of syntactic labels (e.g. N, VP), context words, and head words. Another way is to replace one-layer neural networks by more advanced networks. In Chapter 6, based on empirical results which show that the Long short term memory (LSTM) architecture can capture long range dependencies and deal with the vanishing gradient problem more effectively than Recurrent neural networks, I introduce a novel variant of the LSTM, called Recursive-LSTM, that works on trees. Empirical results on an artificial task and on the Stanford Sentiment Treebank confirm that the proposed Recursive-LSTM model is superior to the classic RNN model in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, in Chapter 7, I demonstrate how a convolutional neural network can be used as a composition function.

The second direction to extend the classic RNN is to focus on how information flows in a parse tree. In traditional compositional semantics approaches, including the RNN model, information flows in a bottom-up manner, leading to a situation where there is no way for a node to be aware of its surrounding context. As a result, these approaches are not applicable to top-down processes such as several top-down generative parsing models, and to problems requiring contexts such as semantic role labelling. In Chapter 4, I propose a solution to this, namely the Inside-Outside Semantic framework, in which the key idea is to allow information to flow not only bottom-up but also top-down. In this way, we can recursively compute representations for the content and the context of the phrase that a node in a parse tree covers. The Inside-Outside RNN model, a neural-net-based instance of this framework, is shown to work well on several tasks, including unsupervised composition function learning from raw texts, supervised semantic role labelling, and dependency parsing (Chapter 5).

The third direction is dealing with the uncertainty of the correct parse. As a result of relying on the principle of compositionality, compositional semantics uses syntactic parse trees to guide composition, which in turn makes compositional semantics approaches vulnerable to the errors of automatic parsers. The problems here are that automatic parsers are not flawless, and that they are not aware of domains to which they are applied. To overcome this problem, in Chapter 7, I propose the Forest Convolutional Network model, which takes as input a forest of parse trees rather than a single tree as in traditional approaches. The key idea is that we should give the model several options and let it select (or combine) ones that best fit its need. Empirical results show that the model performs on par with state-of-the-art models on the Stanford Sentiment Treebank and on the TREC question dataset.

The dissertation thus proposes solutions to the main shortcomings of the RNN model. It provides all components for a completely neural implementation of a syntacticsemantic parser: the three ideas above essentially yield a neural inside-outside algorithm. This represents an approach to NLP that combines the best of two worlds: all the flexibility and learning power of deep learning without sacrificing the linguistic adequacy of earlier approaches in computational linguistics.

***

Summary in Dutch:

Het leren van vector-representaties van zinnen – de ‘recursive deep learning’-aanpak
Phong Lê

Samenvatting:

Systemen voor taalverwerking per computer waren tot voor kort grotendeels gebaseerd op complexe, symbolische representaties en, voor zover ze gebruik maken van machinaal leren, toch afhankelijk van met de hand geselecteerde lijstjes van kenmerken. Met de opkomst van ‘deep learning’ is het, voor het eerst in the geschiedenis van het vakgebied, mogelijk geworden om ook die kenmerk-selectie te gaan automatiseren. In de afgelopen jaren hebben we succesvolle deep learning-systemen zien verschijnen die nauwelijks of geen handmatige kenmerk-selectie behoeven en toch bij de best presterende systemen behoren op taken zoals automatisch ontleden, automatisch vertalen, sentiment-analyse en woordvoorspelling.

Die successen betekenen echter niet dat we alle taalkundig ge ̈ınformeerde benaderingen nu aan de kant moeten schuiven. In dit proefschrift exploreer ik op welke manier taalkundige kennis ingezet kan worden om nog betere neurale netwerk-modellen van taal te kunnen bouwen. Ik pak de uitdaging op om vector-representaties voor zinnen uit te rekenen op basis van een hybride symbolisch-connectionistische benadering, uitgaande van het zogeheten compositionaliteitsbeginsel. In mijn aanpak levert de symbolische traditie de syntactische structuur van zinnen, maar gebruik ik neurale netwerken om representaties van woorden, combinaties van woorden en zinnen te leren.

Alle modellen die ik uitwerk in dit proefschrift zijn varianten van het Recursive Neural Network (RNN). Een RNN neemt een zin, een syntactische boom en vectorrepresentaties van de woorden in die zin als input. Vervolgens gebruikt het model een neuraal netwerk om recursief representaties uit te rekenen voor combinaties van woorden, beginnend bij de combinaties van woorden die volgens de syntactische boom een frase vormen, en eindigend met een representatie voor de hele zin. Het RNN is een populair model vanwege de elegante definitie en veelbelovende empirische resultaten. Het model heeft echter ook heel duidelijke beperkingen: (i) de compositie-functies die het leert zijn taalkundig defici ̈ent; (ii) het model kan alleen in een bottom-up richting worden toegepast; (iii) het model is extreem gevoelig voor fouten in de aangeboden syntactische bomen. Met het standaard RNN-model als startpunt stel ik daarom een uitbreidingen voor in drie richtingen als oplossingen voor elk van deze drie problemen.

Het eerste type uitbreidingen betreft het verbeteren van de compositie-functies. E ́en manier om dat te doen is om gebruik te maken van syntactische en context-informatie, zoals ik dat doe in hoofdstuk 3. De compositie-functies in dat hoofdstuk zijn nog steeds zogeheten ‘one-layer feedforward’-netwerken, maar er is een apart netwerk voor iedere combinatie van syntactische categorie ̈en en ‘heads’. Een andere manier is om die eenvoudige netwerken te vervangen door complexere. In hoofdstuk 6 rapporteer ik resultaten waaruit blijkt dat het zogeheten Long Short Term Memory-netwerk (LSTM) effectiever omgaat met lange afstandsafhankelijkheden en het ‘vanishing gradient’probleem dan de veelgebruikte recurrente netwerken. Ik werk in dat hoofdstuk een nieuwe variant van het LSTM uit, het ‘Recursive LSTM’, dat werkt met syntactisch bomen. Empirische resultaten op een kuntmatige taak en op de Stanford Sentiment Treebank laten zien dat dit nieuwe model veel accurater is dan het standaard RNN. In hoofdstuk 7 laat ik tenslotte zien dat ook zogeheten convolutional neural networks succesvol gebruikt kunnen worden om de compositie-functie mee te implementeren.

Het tweede type uitbreidingen betreft de manier waarop informatie stroomt door een syntactische boom. In klassieke compositionele semantiek-benaderingen, waaronder ook de RNN, is die informatie-stroom strikt bottom-up, waardoor een knoop in zo’n boom geen toegang heeft tot informatie over de context van een zin. Zulke benaderingen zijn daarom moeilijk te combineren met technieken die top-down werken, zoals verschillende populaire statistische modellen voor automatisch ontleden, of technieken die gebruik maken van context-informatie, zoals populaire modellen voor semantische rolbepaling. In hoofdstuk 4 stel ik een oplossing voor voor deze problemen, onder de naam ‘Inside-Outside Semantics framework’, waar het centrale idee is dat informatie zowel bottom-up als top-down moet kunnen stromen. Ik stel voor om voor elke knoop in een syntactische boom twee representaties te berekenen (via recursieve definities): een ‘content representation’ voor het corresponderende deel van de zin die bottom-up wordt berekend, en een ’context representation’ die top-down wordt bepaald. Ik laat zien, in hoofdstuk 5, dat een neurale netwerk-implementatie van dit idee heel goed werkt op een reeks van verschillende taken, inclusief ‘unsupervised composition function learning’, ‘semantic role labeling’ en ‘dependency parsing’.

Het derde type uitbreidingen betreft de omgang met onzekerheid over de juiste syntactische ontleedboom. Ontleedbomen zijn een cruciaal onderdeel van alle modellen in deze dissertatie, omdat volgens het compositionaliteitsbeginsel de syntactische structuur bepaalt welke semantische composities worden uitgevoerd, en op welk moment. Dat maakt de aanpak gevoelig voor fouten in de ontleedbomen. Dergelijke fouten worden onvermijdelijk door automatische ontleedprogramma’s ge ̈ıntroduceerd, omdat die programma’s binnen het domein waar ze voor zijn ontwikkeld al niet foutloos opereren, maar bovendien in veel gevallen buiten dat domein worden ingezet. Om dit probleem het hoofd te bieden stel ik in hoofdstuk 7 het ‘Forest Convolutional Network’ voor, dat in plaats van een enkele ontleedboom een grote verzameling bomen, een zogeheten ‘parse forest’, als input krijgt. Het idee achter dit model is dus dat het model uit een variatie aan mogelijkheden de syntactisch structuur kiest (of samenstelt) die het beste past bij de waar het model voor wordt geoptimaliseerd. De empirische resultaten laten zien dat het resulterende model tot de best beschikbare modellen behoort op twee populaire taken: de ‘Stanford Sentiment Treebank’-taak en de ’TREC vraag-classificatie’-taak.

In dit proefschrift beschrijf ik dus concrete oplossingen voor de belangrijkste tekortkomingen van het RNN-model. Daarmee bevat dit proefschrift alle ingredi ̈enten voor een volledige neurale implementatie van een syntactisch-semantische parser: de drie beschreven uitbreidingen komen neer op een neurale versie van het ‘inside-outside’algoritme. De aanpak in dit proefschrift biedt daarmee het beste van twee werelden: de enorme flexibiliteit en zelflerende kracht van ‘deep learning’, zonder de taalkundige principes en uitdrukkingskracht van eerdere benaderingen in de computationele taalkunde op te geven.